Interesting Historical Figures Thread

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    Interesting Historical Figures Thread

    John Wesley Hardin





      Spoiler:
    Outlaw and gunslinger John Wesley Hardin was born May 26, 1853, in Bonham, Texas. Rumored to be so mean he once shot a man for snoring, Hardin was shot to death in El Paso on August 19, 1895, by a man he had hired to kill someone else.

    John's father, James G. Hardin, was a Methodist preacher, lawyer, schoolteacher and circuit rider. His mother was Elizabeth Hardin. At age fourteen, John stabbed a schoolmate. At age fifteen, he shot a black man to death in Polk County. While fleeing from the law following that murder, he killed at least one, and possibly four Union soldiers who were attempting to apprehend him.

    As a cowboy on the Chisolm Trail in 1871, Hardin killed seven people. He killed three more upon arriving in Abilene, Kansas. Back in Texas, following a run-in with the State Police back in Gonzales County, Hardin got married, settled down and had three children. But he soon resumed his murder spree, killing 4 more times before surrendering to the Cherokee County sheriff in September 1872. He broke out of jail after a couple of weeks, however.

    Hardin next killed Jack Helm, a former State Police captain, who led the fight against the anti-Reconstructionist forces of Jim Taylor in the Sutton-Taylor Feud. Hardin had become a supporter of Taylor's from 1873 to 1874.

    In May 1874, Hardin killed a deputy sheriff in Brown County while visiting the town of Comanche. Fleeing to Florida with his family, Hardin was captured by Texas Rangers in Pensacola on July 23, 1877. During that flight, he killed at least one, and perhaps as many as five more victims.

    On September 28, 1878, Hardin was sentenced to twenty-five years for the Brown County deputy's murder. He was pardoned on March 16, 1894. Having studied law while in prison, Hardin was admitted to the Texas bar soon after his release.

    In 1895, Hardin went to El Paso to testify for the defense in a murder trial. Following the trial, he stayed and established a law practice. Just when he seemed to finally be going straight, Hardin began an affair with one of his married female clients. Her husband found out about the affair and Hardin hired some law officials to kill him. One of the hired gunmen, however, Constable John Selman, shot Hardin instead.

    Legend has it that his last words were, "Four sixes to beat, Henry." When killed, Hardin was shooting dice with local furniture dealer Henry Brown at the Acme saloon in El Paso. Thus ended the life and career of one of Texas deadliest gunslingers. Despite his killing of over thirty people, Hardin had a reputation as a gentleman among those who knew him, and he always claimed he never killed anyone who didn't need killing.

    Bibliography: Wendy Brabner, ed., Texas Monthly Texas Characters Datebook 1985 (Austin, Texas: Texas Monthly Press, 1984). Ron Tyler, ed., The New Handbook of Texas, Vol. 3 (Austin, Texas: Texas State Historical Association, 1996) pp. 454-55.
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    Interesting Historical Figures Thread

    Isn't he playing with the Rockets this year?

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    I can't wait to see The's addition to this thread

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    Jesus

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    Jesus Christ was born in 2-6 BCE in Bethlehem, Judea. Little is known about his early life, but as a young man, he founded Christianity, one of the world’s most influential religions. His life is recorded in the New Testament, more a theological document than a biography. According to Christians, Jesus is considered the incarnation of God and his teachings an example for living a more spiritual life. Christians believe he died for the sins of all people and rose from the dead.
    Profile

    Most of Jesus’ life is told through the four Gospels of the New Testament Bible, known as the Canonical gospels, written by Matthew, Mark, Luke and John. These are not biographies in the modern sense but accounts with allegorical intent. They are written to engender faith in Jesus as the Messiah and the incarnation of God, who came to teach, suffer and die for people’s sins.
    Jesus was born between 2 and 6 BCE, in Bethlehem, Judea. His mother, Mary, was a virgin who was betrothed to Joseph, a carpenter. Christians believe Jesus was born through Immaculate Conception. His lineage can be traced back to the house of David. According to the Gospel of Matthew (2:1), Jesus was born during the reign of Herod the Great, who upon hearing of his birth felt threatened and tried to kill Jesus by ordering all of Bethlehem’s male children under age two to be killed. But Joseph was warned by an angel and took Mary and the child to Egypt until Herod’s death, where upon he brought the family back and settled in the town of Nazareth, in Galilee.
    There is very little written about Jesus’ early life. The Gospel of Luke (2:41-52) recounts that a 12-year-old Jesus had accompanied his parents on a pilgrimage to Jerusalem and became separated. He was found several days later in a temple, discussing affairs with some of Jerusalem’s elders. Throughout the New Testament, there are trace references of Jesus working as a carpenter while a young adult. It is believed that he began his ministry at age 30 when he was baptized by John the Baptist, who upon seeing Jesus, declared him the Son of God.
    After baptism, Jesus went into the Judean desert to fast and meditate for 40 days and nights. The Temptation of Christ is chronicled in the Gospels of Matthew, Mark and Luke (known as the Synoptic Gospels). The Devil appeared and tempted Jesus three times, once to turn stone to bread, once to cast himself off a mountain where angels would save him, and once to offer him all the kingdoms of the world. All three times, Jesus rejected the Devil’s temptation and sent him off.
    Jesus returned to Galilee and made trips to neighboring villages. During this time several people became his disciples. One of these was Mary Magdalene, who is first mentioned the Gospel of Luke (16:9) and later in all four gospels at the crucifixion. Though not mentioned in the context of the “12 disciples,” she is considered to have been involved in Jesus’ ministry from the beginning to his death and after. According to the gospels of Mark and John, Jesus appeared to Magdalene first after his resurrection.


    According to the Gospel of John (2:1-11), as Jesus was beginning his ministry, he and his disciples traveled with his mother, Mary, to a wedding at Cana in Galilee. The wedding host had run out of wine and Jesus’ mother came to him for help. At first, Jesus refused to intervene, but then he relented and asked a servant to bring him large jars filled with water. He turned the water into a wine of higher quality than any served during the wedding. John’s gospel depicts the event as the first sign of Jesus’ glory and his disciples’ belief in him.
    After the wedding, Jesus, his mother Mary and his disciples traveled to Jerusalem for Passover. At the temple, they saw moneychangers and merchants selling wares. In a rare display of anger, Jesus overturned the tables and, with a whip made of cords, drove them out, declaring that his Father’s house is not a house for merchants.
    The Synoptic Gospels chronicle Jesus as he traveled through Judea and Galilee, using parables and miracles to explain how the prophecies were being fulfilled and that the kingdom of God was near. As word spread of Jesus’ teaching and healing the sick and diseased, more people began to follow him. At one point, Jesus came to a level area and was joined by a great number of people. There, at the Sermon on the Mount, he presented several discourses, known as the Beatitudes, which encapsulate many of the spiritual teachings of love, humility and compassion.
    As Jesus continued preaching about the kingdom of God, the crowds grew larger and began to proclaim him as the son of David and as the Messiah. The Pharisees heard of this and publicly challenged Jesus, accusing him of having the power of Satan. He defended his actions with a parable, then questioned their logic and told them such thinking denied the power of God, which only further hardened their resolve to work against him.
    Near the city of Caesarea Philippi, Jesus talked with his disciples. According to the gospels of Matthew (16:13), Mark (8:27) and Luke (9:18), he asked, “Who do you say that I am?” The question confused them, and only Peter responded, saying, “You are the Christ, the Son of the living God.” Jesus blessed Peter, accepting the titles of “Christ” and the “Son of God,” and declared the proclamation was a divine revelation from God. Jesus then proclaimed Peter to be the leader of the church. Jesus then warned his disciples of the Pharisees’ conspiracy against him and of his fate to suffer and be killed, only to rise from the dead on the third day.
    Less than a week later, Jesus took three of his disciples to a high mountain where they could pray alone. According to the Synoptic Gospels, Jesus’ face began shining like the sun and his entire body glowed with a white light. Then, the prophets Elijah and Moses appeared, and Jesus talked to them. A bright cloud emerged around them, and a voice said, “This is my beloved Son, with whom I am well pleased; listen to him.” This event, known as the Transfiguration, is a pivotal moment in Christian theology.


    It supports the identity of Jesus as the Christ, the Son of the living God.
    Jesus arrived in Jerusalem, the week before the holiday of Passover, riding on a donkey. Great numbers of people took palm branches and greeted him at the city’s entry. They praised him as the Son of David and as the Son of God. The priests and Pharisees, fearful of the growing public adulation, felt he must be stopped.
    All four Gospels describe Jesus’ final week in Jerusalem. During this time, Jesus raised Lazarus from the dead, confronted moneychangers and merchants in the temple, and debated with the high priests who questioned Jesus’ authority. He told his disciples about the coming days and that Jerusalem’s temple would be destroyed. Meanwhile, the chief priests and elders met with high priest Caiaphas, and set plans in motion to arrest Jesus. One of the disciples, Judas, met with the chief priests and told them how he would deliver Jesus to them. They agreed to pay him 30 pieces of silver.
    Jesus and his 12 disciples met for the Passover meal, and he gave them his final words of faith. He also foretold of his betrayal by one of the disciples and privately let Judas know it was he. Jesus told Peter that before a rooster crowed the next morning, three times he will have denied he knows Jesus. At the end of the meal, Jesus instituted the Eucharist, which in the Christian religion, signifies the covenant between God and humans.
    After the Last Supper, Jesus and his disciples went to the Garden of Gethsemane to pray. Jesus asked God if this cup (his suffering and death) might pass by him. He implored a group of his disciples to pray with him, but they kept falling asleep. Then the time had come. Soldiers and officials appeared, and Judas was with them. He gave Jesus a kiss on the cheek to identify him and the soldiers arrested Jesus. One disciple tried to resist the arrest, brandished his sword and cut the ear off one of the soldiers. But Jesus admonished him and healed the soldier’s wound.
    After his arrest, many of the disciples went into hiding. Jesus was taken to the high priest and interrogated. He was hit and spat upon for not responding. Meanwhile, Peter had followed Jesus to the high priests’ court. As he hid in the shadows, three house servants asked if he was one of Jesus’ disciples and each time he denied it. After each denial, a rooster crowed. Then Jesus was led out of the house and looked directly at Peter. Peter remembered how Jesus had told him he would deny him and he wept bitterly. Judas, who was watching from a distance, became distraught by his betrayal of Jesus and attempted to return the 30 pieces of silver. The priests told him his guilt was his own. He threw the coins into the temple and later hanged himself.
    The next day, Jesus was taken to the high court where he was mocked, beaten and condemned for claiming to be the Son of God. He was brought before Pontius Pilate, the Roman governor of Judea. The priests accused Jesus of claiming to be the King of the Jews and asked that he be condemned to death.


    At first Pilate tried to pass Jesus off to King Herod, but he was brought back, and Pilate told the Jewish priests he could find no fault with Jesus. The priests reminded him that anyone who claimed to be a king speaks against Caesar. Pilate publicly washed his hands of responsibility, yet ordered the crucifixion in response to the demands of the crowd. The Roman soldiers whipped and beat Jesus, placed a crown of thorns on his head and then led him off to Mount Calvary.
    Jesus was crucified with two thieves, one at his left and the other at his right. Above his head was the charge against him, “King of the Jews.” At his feet were his mother, Mary, and Mary Magdalene. The Gospels describe various events that occurred during the last three hours of his life, including the taunting by the soldiers and the crowd, Jesus’ agony and outbursts, and his final words. While he was on the cross, the sky darkened, and immediately upon his death an earthquake erupted, tearing the temple’s curtain from top to bottom. A soldier confirmed his death by sticking a spear into his side, which produced only water. He was taken down from the cross and buried in a nearby tomb.
    Three days after his death, Jesus’ tomb was found empty. He had risen from the dead and appeared first to Mary Magdalene and then to his mother Mary. They both informed the disciples, who were in hiding, and later, Jesus appeared to them and told them not to be afraid. During this brief time, he beseeched his disciples to go into the world and preach the gospel to all humanity. After 40 days, Jesus led his disciples to Mount Olivet, east of Jerusalem. Jesus spoke his final words to them, saying they would receive the power of the Holy Spirit. Then Jesus was taken upward on a cloud and ascended into heaven.
    Last edited by usaosooner; December 27th, 2012 at 12:29 PM. Reason: wall of text spoiler

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    Interesting Historical Figures Thread

    Jesus Christ Bounce!

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    1. Please Spoiler long text posts for ease of those browsing on their phones

    2. Dont try to Dome the thread up.

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    Kaspar Hauser

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    William Anderson "Devil Anse" Hatfield



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    Born in 1839, Devil Anse Hatfield grew up in what is now Logan County, West Virginia. He took a leading role in his family's feud with the McCoys. In 1882, Hatfield's brother was murdered and he had the three McCoys responsible killed. He was indicted for his role in these crimes, but never was tried. Hatfield may have also been involved in 1888 attack on Randall McCoy and his family. He died in 1921.

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    Interesting Historical Figures Thread

    James Alexander Dewar

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    James was born on February 5, 1897 in Cook County, Illinois.

    Dewar worked at the Continental Baking Company, which later through a series of mergers and acquisitions became Hostess Brands. He started as a delivery boy in 1920 by delivering pastries by horse-drawn cart. Dewar eventually rose up through the ranks to be a plant manager.

    In 1931, Dewar's plant was making strawberry shortcakes but only during strawberry season. Dewar came up with an idea to create a shortcake with cream on the inside instead of strawberries. Having seen a billboard for a shoe company called the "Twinkle Toe Shoe Co." he was inspired to call his shortcake invention a "Twinkie".[1]

    Dewar rose to be regional vice-president at Hostess and held that position until 1972.[2]

    Dewar died on June 30, 1985 in Downers Grove, Illinois, at the age of 88.


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    Basically, a BAMF. . .

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    Originally Posted by usaosooner View Post
    1. Please Spoiler long text posts for ease of those browsing on their phones

    2. Dont try to Dome the thread up.

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    Interesting Historical Figures Thread

    Howard Hughes is very interesting.

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    Jesse Chisholm



      Spoiler:
    . CHISHOLM, JESSE (ca. 1805-1868)


    Of Scottish and Cherokee descent, plainsman Jesse Chisholm is best remembered today by the Chisholm Trail, the famous route of cattle drives across Indian Territory (present Oklahoma) from Texas to Kansas. He was, however, far more historically significant as a frontier trader who first worked among the Plains Indians and served as a mediator in their dealings with the Cherokee Nation, the Republic of Texas, and the United States.

    Chisholm first emerged into historical notice as a member of a gold-searching party that explored up the Arkansas River to the site of present Wichita, Kansas, in 1826. Four years later he helped blaze a trail from Fort Gibson to Fort Towson, and in 1834 he was a member of the Dodge-Leavenworth Expedition, which made the first official contact with the Comanche, Kiowa, and Wichita near the Wichita Mountains in southwestern Oklahoma.

    In 1836 Chisholm married fifteen-year-old Eliza Edwards, daughter of Creek trader James Edwards, who operated a trading post situated on the right bank of the Little River about three miles above its confluence with the North Canadian River. From there, Chisholm made trading ventures onto the prairie, becoming close friends with tribe leaders. Eventually, he moved west along the Canadian River and established a trading post near present Asher and later at Council Grove along the North Canadian River near present western Oklahoma City.

    During the 1840s Chisholm assisted the Republic of Texas and the United States in bringing American Indian leaders to treaty councils in which he served as an intermediary and interpreter. Following the 1846 Treaty of Comanche Peak, Chisholm accompanied an Indian delegation to Washington, D.C., where he interpreted for Pres. James K. Polk. During the Civil War Chisholm established a ranch near present Wichita, Kansas. Following the war he was again instrumental in bringing Indian leaders to treaty councils in Kansas. He died on March 4, 1868, while trading with Americans Indians on Salt Creek. His grave is located northeast of Geary, Oklahoma.
    Last edited by OrangeBlossom; January 17th, 2013 at 06:37 PM. Reason: Fixed image

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    Sherman's march to the sea is the definition of American Badass..,
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    Karl Llewellyn. (Personal hero of mine.)

      Spoiler:

    Karl was a prominent legal professor at the Univ. of Chicago. While being generally badass, his main contribution was that he was the principal drafter of the Uniform Commercial Code, which is used in all 50 states to define and regulate commerce.

    The UCC is the longest and most elaborate of the uniform acts. The Code has been a long-term, joint project of the National Conference of Commissioners on Uniform State Laws (NCCUSL) and the American Law Institute (ALI),[1] who began drafting its first version in 1942. Judge Herbert F. Goodrich was the Chairman of the Editorial Board of the original 1952 edition,[2] and the Code itself was drafted by some of the top legal scholars in the United States, including Karl N. Llewellyn, William A. Schnader, Soia Mentschikoff, and Grant Gilmore.
    The Code, as the product of private organizations, is not itself the law, but only a recommendation of the laws that should be adopted in the states. Once enacted by a state, the UCC is codified into the state’s code of statutes. A state may adopt the UCC verbatim as written by ALI and NCCUSL, or a state may adopt the UCC with specific changes. Unless such changes are minor, they can seriously obstruct the Code's express objective of promoting uniformity of law among the various states. Thus persons doing business in different states must check local law.
    The ALI and NCCUSL have established a permanent editorial board for the Code. This board has issued a number of official comments and other published papers. Although these commentaries do not have the force of law, courts interpreting the Code often cite them as persuasive authority in determining the effect of one or more provisions. Courts interpreting the Code generally seek to harmonize their interpretations with those of other states that have adopted the same or a similar provision.
    In one or another of its several revisions, the UCC has been enacted in all of the 50 states, as well as in the District of Columbia, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico[citation needed], Guam[3] and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Louisiana has enacted most provisions of the UCC, with the exception of Article 2, preferring to maintain its own civil law tradition for governing the sale of goods.

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    Bruce Drake

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    NORMAN, Okla. -- The only University of Oklahoma coach enshrined in the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame, Bruce Drake led the Sooners to 200 wins, six conference titles and a pair of NCAA Final Fours in his 17 years on the sideline (1939-55). Many of those triumphs occurred in the OU Field House.

    Few OU fans may be aware, however, that Drake, who was known for championing the small player in basketball, is responsible for the implementation of a rule almost 69 years ago that forever changed the game on the college and professional levels -- goaltending.

    Drake's Sooner teams were usually on the small side, even incurring the nickname "Roundball Runts" late in his career. His famous "Shuffle" offense that consisted of long possessions of systematic passing was designed to lessen the impact of opposing big men on defense. But those big men kept getting bigger, and the practice of snatching shots about to drop through the hoop was not against the rules. Drake felt the relatively new custom was negatively affecting the sport.

    In the mid-1940s, one opposing center was particularly dominant on the defensive end. That was Oklahoma A&M 7-footer Bob Kurland, a three-time All-American. The Aggies, under the direction of fellow future Hall-of-Fame head coach Henry Iba, would position Kurland beneath the opposing basket, effectively serving as a "goaltender" to incoming field goal attempts and knocking them away as they approached the rim.



    Drake (left) and rival Oklahoma A&M coach Henry Iba.
    Drake was of the belief that once a shot reached its apex and started falling toward the goal, its course should not be altered by a defender. According to former longtime OU sports publicist Harold Keith, Kurland, as a freshman, "plucked out 22 probables" that left the hands of Sooner shooters in the 1943 Bedlam meeting in Stillwater, an Aggies' victory.

    Realizing he had three more years to contend with Kurland, Drake decided to issue a full-court press of sorts. It began with a story he and Keith submitted to the Saturday Evening Post titled "Seven-Foot Trouble." Published in the Feb. 19, 1944, issue, Drake's story (as told to Keith) attacked the practice of goaltending.

    One of the lines in Drake's article read, "A coach feels as a golfer would if his opponent suddenly reached out his hand to intercept a perfect putt inches in front of the can."

    Continuing his effort to organize opposition to the practice, Drake then conducted a national poll of his colleagues on their thoughts about the goaltending issue. He was delighted to find out his fellow coaches were overwhelmingly on his side.

    Of goaltending, even Iba said, "I know it smells. I hope Bob (Kurland) helps eliminate it from the game."



    Oklahoma A&M 7-foot center Bob Kurland was a goaltending nemesis for OU.
    And in one more move aimed at helping outlaw the practice, Drake invited National Rules Committee chairman James St. Clair to the Oklahoma-Oklahoma A&M game in the OU Field House in 1944 to monitor Kurland's swipes. St. Clair didn't watch from the stands, or even courtside. That's because Drake constructed a small platform above the north goal on which St. Clair could sit and get a closer look at what was taking place.

    The multi-level crusade worked, and in stunningly short fashion. Just 38 days after the publish date of Drake's Saturday Evening Post submission, St. Clair and the rules committee established legislation forbidding defensive players from touching the ball on its downward flight on a shot for the goal. Violation of the rule would result in the field goal (two points).

    It was a major victory for Drake that would alter the game in a significant manner. Those in opposition to the new legislation argued that it constituted a "cruel assault" on big men.

    Countered Drake, "The only tall players handicapped will be those who can only tend goal. The tall player will still have a wide advantage in rebounding, post play, shooting and recovery of loose balls."

    Then he quipped, "Of course, he will have to know some basketball."

    The goaltending rule was soon adopted in the pro game and still exists today.



    The Feb. 19, 1944, Saturday Evening Post issue in which Drake's story "Seven-Foot Trouble" appeared.
    The nation's coaches, impressed with Drake's aggressive campaign against the practice of goaltending, later voted him chairman of the National Rules Committee. He served his last five seasons as OU head coach in that capacity.

    Drake, who was also an assistant coach on the USA's 1956 gold-medal-winning Olympic team and was enshrined in the Naismith Memorial Hall of Fame in 1973, passed away in 1983 one day before turning 79. He lived almost 40 years after the implementation of the goaltending rule for which he adamantly fought.

    - - - - -

    The Sooner men's basketball team returns to OU's historic Field House on Monday, Dec. 31 (New Year's Eve) for its game against Texas A&M-Corpus Christi. Tip is slated for 2 p.m. Tickets are just $10 for adults, $5 for kids ages 2-12 and available online now.

    The game, and our 10-day countdown, will highlight OU's basketball success in the 1940s with a focus on the 1946-47 season. The Sooners made their second trip to the Final Four under head coach Bruce Drake in March of '47. Check back each day for features, photos and video as OU celebrates the Field House Series.

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    John Brown 1800-1859



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    John Brown (May 9, 1800 – December 2, 1859) was an American abolitionist who used violent actions to fight slavery.[1] During 1856 in Kansas, Brown commanded forces at the Battle of Black Jack and the Battle of Osawatomie.[1] Brown's followers also killed five pro-slavery supporters at Pottawatomie.[1] In 1859, Brown led an unsuccessful raid on the federal armory at Harpers Ferry that ended with his capture.[1] Brown's trial resulted in his conviction and a sentence of death by hanging.[1]
    Brown's attempt in 1859 to start a liberation movement among enslaved African Americans in Harpers Ferry, Virginia electrified the nation. He was tried for treason against the Commonwealth of Virginia, the murder of five pro-slavery Southerners and inciting a slave insurrection. He was found guilty on all counts and was hanged. Southerners alleged that his rebellion was the tip of the abolitionist iceberg and represented the wishes of the Republican Party to end slavery. Historians agree that the Harpers Ferry raid in 1859 escalated tensions that, a year later, led to secession and the American Civil War.
    Brown first gained attention when he led small groups of volunteers during the Bleeding Kansas crisis. Unlike most other Northerners, who advocated peaceful resistance to the pro-slavery faction, Brown demanded violent action in response to Southern aggression. He believed he was the instrument of God's wrath in punishing men for the sin of owning slaves.[2]
    Dissatisfied with the pacifism encouraged by the organized abolitionist movement, he said, "These men are all talk. What we need is action—action!" [3] During the Kansas campaign he and his supporters killed five pro-slavery southerners in what became known as the Pottawatomie Massacre in May 1856 in response to the raid of the "free soil" city of Lawrence. In 1859 he led a raid on the federal armory at Harpers Ferry. During the raid, he seized the armory; seven people were killed, and ten or more were injured. He intended to arm slaves with weapons from the arsenal, but the attack failed. Within 36 hours, Brown's men had fled or been killed or captured by local pro slavery farmers, militiamen, and U.S. Marines led by Robert E. Lee. Brown's subsequent capture by federal forces seized the nation's attention, as Southerners feared it was just the first of many Northern plots to cause a slave rebellion that might endanger their lives, while Republicans dismissed the notion and said they would not interfere with slavery in the South.[4]
    Historians agree John Brown played a major role in the start of the Civil War. Historian David Potter (1976) said the emotional effect of Brown's raid was greater than the philosophical effect of the Lincoln–Douglas debates, and that his raid revealed a deep division between North and South.[5] Brown's actions prior to the Civil War as an abolitionist, and the tactics he chose, still make him a controversial figure today. He is sometimes memorialized as a heroic martyr and a visionary and sometimes vilified as a madman and a terrorist.[6] Historians debate whether he was "America's first domestic terrorist".[7]
    Some writers, such as Bruce Olds, describe him as a monomaniacal zealot, others, such as Stephen B. Oates, regard him as "one of the most perceptive human beings of his generation." David S. Reynolds hails the man who "killed slavery, sparked the civil war, and seeded civil rights" and Richard Owen Boyer emphasizes that Brown was "an American who gave his life that millions of other Americans might be free."[8] The song "John Brown's Body" made him a heroic martyr and was a popular Union marching song during the Civil War.
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  18. #18

    Interesting Historical Figures Thread

    Norman Borlaug, the man who saved more human lives than anyone else in history. And it seems almost no one knows who he was.

      Spoiler:
    Norman Borlaug, the man who saved more human lives than anyone else in history, died in 2009 at age 95. Borlaug was the Father of the Green Revolution, the dramatic improvement in agricultural productivity that swept the globe in the 1960s. For spearheading this achievement, he was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1970.

    Borlaug grew up on a small farm in Iowa and graduated from the University of Minnesota, where he studied forestry and plant pathology, in the 1930s. In 1944, the Rockefeller Foundation invited him to work on a project to boost wheat production in Mexico. At the time Mexico was importing a good share of its grain. Borlaug and his staff in Mexico spent nearly 20 years breeding the high-yield dwarf wheat that sparked the Green Revolution, the transformation that forestalled the mass starvation predicted by neo-Malthusians.

    In the late 1960s, most experts were speaking of imminent global famines in which billions would perish. "The battle to feed all of humanity is over," biologist Paul Ehrlich famously wrote in his 1968 bestseller The Population Bomb. "In the 1970s and 1980s hundreds of millions of people will starve to death in spite of any crash programs embarked upon now." Ehrlich also said, "I have yet to meet anyone familiar with the situation who thinks India will be self-sufficient in food by 1971." He insisted that "India couldn't possibly feed two hundred million more people by 1980."

    But Borlaug and his team were already engaged in the kind of crash program that Ehrlich declared wouldn't work. Their dwarf wheat varieties resisted a wide spectrum of plant pests and diseases and produced two to three times more grain than the traditional varieties. In 1965, they had begun a massive campaign to ship the miracle wheat to Pakistan and India and teach local farmers how to cultivate it properly. By 1968, when Ehrlich's book appeared, the U.S. Agency for International Development had already hailed Borlaug's achievement as a "Green Revolution."

    In Pakistan, wheat yields rose from 4.6 million tons in 1965 to 8.4 million in 1970. In India, they rose from 12.3 million tons to 20 million. And the yields continue to increase. Last year, India harvested a record 73.5 million tons of wheat, up 11.5 percent from 1998. Since Ehrlich's dire predictions in 1968, India's population has more than doubled, its wheat production has more than tripled, and its economy has grown nine-fold. Soon after Borlaug's success with wheat, his colleagues at the Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research developed high-yield rice varieties that quickly spread the Green Revolution through most of Asia.

    Contrary to Ehrlich's bold pronouncements, hundreds of millions didn't die in massive famines. India fed far more than 200 million more people, and it was close enough to self-sufficiency in food production by 1971 that Ehrlich discreetly omitted his prediction about that from later editions of The Population Bomb. The last four decades have seen a "progress explosion" that has handily outmatched any "population explosion."

    Borlaug, who unfortunately is far less well-known than doom-sayer Ehrlich, is responsible for much of the progress humanity has made against hunger. Despite occasional local famines caused by armed conflicts or political mischief, food is more abundant and cheaper today than ever before in history, due in large part to the work of Borlaug and his colleagues.

    More than 30 years ago, Borlaug wrote, "One of the greatest threats to mankind today is that the world may be choked by an explosively pervading but well camouflaged bureaucracy."

    Meanwhile, media darlings like Worldwatch Institute founder Lester Brown keep up their drumbeat of doom. In 1981 Brown declared, "The period of global food security is over." In 1994, he wrote, "The world's farmers can no longer be counted on to feed the projected additions to our numbers." And as recently as 1997 he warned, "Food scarcity will be the defining issue of the new era now unfolding, much as ideological conflict was the defining issue of the historical era that recently ended."

    Borlaug's achievements were not confined to the laboratory and fields:

    He insisted that governments pay poor farmers world prices for their grain. At the time, many developing nations--eager to supply cheap food to their urban citizens, who might otherwise rebel--required their farmers to sell into a government concession that paid them less than half of the world market price for their agricultural products. The result, predictably, was hoarding and underproduction. Using his hard-won prestige as a kind of platform, Mr. Borlaug persuaded the governments of Pakistan and India to drop such self-defeating policies.

    Fair prices and high doses of fertilizer, combined with new grains, changed everything. By 1968 Pakistan was self-sufficient in wheat, and by 1974 India was self-sufficient in all cereals. And the revolution didn't stop there. Researchers at a research institute in the Philippines used Mr. Borlaug's insights to develop high-yield rice and spread the Green Revolution to most of Asia. As with wheat, so with rice: Short-stalked varieties proved more productive. They devoted relatively more energy to making grain and less to making leaves and stalks. And they were sturdier, remaining harvestable when traditional varieties--with heavy grain heads and long, slender stalks--had collapsed to the ground and begun to rot.
    2 users like StoopsCreepyPinky's post: NAMLOOT, oucub23


  19. #19

    Interesting Historical Figures Thread

    Originally Posted by SoCaliSooner View Post



    Sherman's march to the sea is the definition of American Badass..,
    Read about some of the stuff Custer pulled before Little Big Horn. He was a wild man.

  20. #20
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    Howard Schnellenberger




      Spoiler:
    Late in the 1994 season, Oklahoma head coach Gary Gibbs was forced to resign, but was allowed to finish out the season. Schnellenberger was hired to replace him on December 16, 1994.[10] Repeating his bluster upon taking the Louisville job, Schnellenberger declared, "They'll write books and make movies about my time here." He also traveled across the state, with the stated goal of renewing the enthusiasm in what he called "Sooner Nation." After watching his new team for the first time in the 1994 Copper Bowl (in which Oklahoma was routed by BYU 31–6), he alienated his soon-to-be players by declaring them "out of shape, unorganized and unmotivated" and that they disgraced Oklahoma's rich football tradition.[11]

    After a 3–0 start that had the Sooners ranked in the top 10, it quickly came unraveled after a 38–17 loss to Colorado on ESPN. That was the start of a stretch where the Sooners only went 2–5–1 the rest of the way, including a 2–5 record in conference play—Oklahoma's first losing record in conference play in 31 years, and only the second since World War II. They were also defeated 12–0 by Oklahoma State—the Sooners' first loss to their in-state rival in 20 years. En route, the Sooners were penalized nine times per game, which is very unusual since Schnellenberger has traditionally coached very disciplined teams. The Sooners closed out the season with their second-straight shutout, a 37-0 loss at No. 1 1995 Nebraska, which prevented Oklahoma from attaining a winning season or a bowl venue.

    On December 19, 1995, Schnellenberger resigned unexpectedly after one season, stating that "in recent months a climate has developed toward the program, understandably in some cases and perhaps unfairly in others, that has changed my outlook on the situation. A change could help improve that climate."[12]

    To this day, Schnellenberger is not held in high regard by Sooner fans, in part because he made no secret of his lack of interest in Oklahoma's football history (his comments after the 1994 Copper Bowl notwithstanding). He ordered the destruction of several old football files (which were actually preserved without his knowledge). He also said on his statewide tour that the team he planned to put together would make "Sooner Nation" forget about head coaches Bud Wilkinson and Barry Switzer.[11][13][14]

    In his only year at Oklahoma, Schnelleneberger lost by one-sided margin to both Kansas and Kansas State. Switzer was 16-0 during his career vs. the Wildcats and 14-2 vs. the Jayhawks.



    After leaving Oklahoma, Schnellenberger decided to try the financial world, and became a bond salesman, passing the certification exam on his third try.
    Last edited by JJohnson14; January 18th, 2013 at 07:36 AM.

  21. #21
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    John brown was a wacko, interesting yes but nuts nevertheless.


    Originally Posted by usaosooner View Post
    John Brown 1800-1859



      Spoiler:
    John Brown (May 9, 1800 – December 2, 1859) was an American abolitionist who used violent actions to fight slavery.[1] During 1856 in Kansas, Brown commanded forces at the Battle of Black Jack and the Battle of Osawatomie.[1] Brown's followers also killed five pro-slavery supporters at Pottawatomie.[1] In 1859, Brown led an unsuccessful raid on the federal armory at Harpers Ferry that ended with his capture.[1] Brown's trial resulted in his conviction and a sentence of death by hanging.[1]
    Brown's attempt in 1859 to start a liberation movement among enslaved African Americans in Harpers Ferry, Virginia electrified the nation. He was tried for treason against the Commonwealth of Virginia, the murder of five pro-slavery Southerners and inciting a slave insurrection. He was found guilty on all counts and was hanged. Southerners alleged that his rebellion was the tip of the abolitionist iceberg and represented the wishes of the Republican Party to end slavery. Historians agree that the Harpers Ferry raid in 1859 escalated tensions that, a year later, led to secession and the American Civil War.
    Brown first gained attention when he led small groups of volunteers during the Bleeding Kansas crisis. Unlike most other Northerners, who advocated peaceful resistance to the pro-slavery faction, Brown demanded violent action in response to Southern aggression. He believed he was the instrument of God's wrath in punishing men for the sin of owning slaves.[2]
    Dissatisfied with the pacifism encouraged by the organized abolitionist movement, he said, "These men are all talk. What we need is action—action!" [3] During the Kansas campaign he and his supporters killed five pro-slavery southerners in what became known as the Pottawatomie Massacre in May 1856 in response to the raid of the "free soil" city of Lawrence. In 1859 he led a raid on the federal armory at Harpers Ferry. During the raid, he seized the armory; seven people were killed, and ten or more were injured. He intended to arm slaves with weapons from the arsenal, but the attack failed. Within 36 hours, Brown's men had fled or been killed or captured by local pro slavery farmers, militiamen, and U.S. Marines led by Robert E. Lee. Brown's subsequent capture by federal forces seized the nation's attention, as Southerners feared it was just the first of many Northern plots to cause a slave rebellion that might endanger their lives, while Republicans dismissed the notion and said they would not interfere with slavery in the South.[4]
    Historians agree John Brown played a major role in the start of the Civil War. Historian David Potter (1976) said the emotional effect of Brown's raid was greater than the philosophical effect of the Lincoln–Douglas debates, and that his raid revealed a deep division between North and South.[5] Brown's actions prior to the Civil War as an abolitionist, and the tactics he chose, still make him a controversial figure today. He is sometimes memorialized as a heroic martyr and a visionary and sometimes vilified as a madman and a terrorist.[6] Historians debate whether he was "America's first domestic terrorist".[7]
    Some writers, such as Bruce Olds, describe him as a monomaniacal zealot, others, such as Stephen B. Oates, regard him as "one of the most perceptive human beings of his generation." David S. Reynolds hails the man who "killed slavery, sparked the civil war, and seeded civil rights" and Richard Owen Boyer emphasizes that Brown was "an American who gave his life that millions of other Americans might be free."[8] The song "John Brown's Body" made him a heroic martyr and was a popular Union marching song during the Civil War.

  22. #22
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    Paul Tibbets - pilot of the Enola Gay.

  23. #23
    I don't think it gets any more badass than this guy.



    Whittemore was born in England. He came to North America in 1745 as an officer in the British Army, where he fought in King George's War (1744-48). He was involved in the capture of the French stronghold, Fort Louisburg. After the war he stayed in the colonies, settling in Menotomy, Massachusetts (present-day Arlington). He subsequently fought in the French and Indian War (1754-63) at the age of 64, once again assisting in the capture of Fort Louisburg.[2]

    On April 19, 1775, British forces were returning to Boston from the Battles of Lexington and Concord, the opening engagements of the war. On their march they were continually shot at by colonial militiamen.

    Whittemore was in his fields when he spotted an approaching British relief brigade under Earl Percy, sent to assist the retreat. Whittemore loaded his musket and ambushed the British from behind a nearby stone wall, killing one soldier. He then drew his dueling pistols and killed a grenadier and mortally wounded a second. By the time Whittemore had fired his third shot, a British detachment reached his position; Whittemore drew his sword and attacked. He was shot in the face, bayoneted thirteen times, and left for dead in a pool of blood. He was found alive, trying to load his musket to fight again. He was taken to Dr. Cotton Tufts of Medford, who perceived no hope for his survival. However, Whittemore lived another 18 years until dying of natural causes at the age of 98.

  24. #24
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    Teddy Roosevelt had a fascinating life. Disagree with a lot of his politics but no doubt he was very interesting.
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  25. #25
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    Originally Posted by Steve O'Seinus View Post
    I don't think it gets any more badass than this guy.



    Whittemore was born in England. He came to North America in 1745 as an officer in the British Army, where he fought in King George's War (1744-48). He was involved in the capture of the French stronghold, Fort Louisburg. After the war he stayed in the colonies, settling in Menotomy, Massachusetts (present-day Arlington). He subsequently fought in the French and Indian War (1754-63) at the age of 64, once again assisting in the capture of Fort Louisburg.[2]

    On April 19, 1775, British forces were returning to Boston from the Battles of Lexington and Concord, the opening engagements of the war. On their march they were continually shot at by colonial militiamen.

    Whittemore was in his fields when he spotted an approaching British relief brigade under Earl Percy, sent to assist the retreat. Whittemore loaded his musket and ambushed the British from behind a nearby stone wall, killing one soldier. He then drew his dueling pistols and killed a grenadier and mortally wounded a second. By the time Whittemore had fired his third shot, a British detachment reached his position; Whittemore drew his sword and attacked. He was shot in the face, bayoneted thirteen times, and left for dead in a pool of blood. He was found alive, trying to load his musket to fight again. He was taken to Dr. Cotton Tufts of Medford, who perceived no hope for his survival. However, Whittemore lived another 18 years until dying of natural causes at the age of 98.
    When he said "get off my lawn," you'd damn sure better get your ass moving.
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  26. #26

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jack_Johnson_(boxer)

    Jack Johnson. Beat up white men, and ****ed white women during a time that wasn't very widely accepted at all. Studied this guy in a History of Sport class I took back at OU many years ago.

      Spoiler:

    Johnson's boxing style was very distinctive. He developed a more patient approach than was customary in that day, basically playing with his opponents, often carrying on a conversation with ring-siders at the same time as he was fighting. Johnson would begin a bout cautiously, slowly building up over the rounds into a more aggressive fighter. When annoyed, he often fought to punish his opponents rather than knock them out, endlessly avoiding their blows and striking with swift counters. He always gave the impression of having much more to offer and, if pushed, he could punch powerfully. There are films of some of his fights in which he can be seen holding up his opponent, who otherwise might have fallen, until he recovered.
    Those were the days when the (mostly white) patrons liked value for money, and it was a habit, especially for black boxers, to make the fight last a respectable time. With the many bouts a fighter engaged in, it was commonplace to have fought the same opponent as many as a dozen or even more times. So it is highly likely that the results of many of these fights were "pre-arranged," and also pre-determined to last a goodly number of rounds.
    Johnson was an early example of the celebrity athlete in the modern era, appearing regularly in the press and later on radio and in motion pictures. He earned considerable sums endorsing various products, including patent medicines, and indulged several expensive hobbies such as automobile racing and tailored clothing, as well as purchasing jewelry and furs for his wives.[25] He even challenged champion racer Barney Oldfield to a match auto race at the Sheepshead Bay, New York one mile (1.6 km) dirt track. Oldfield, far more experienced, easily out-distanced Johnson, ending any thoughts the boxer might have had about becoming a professional driver.[26] Once, when he was pulled over for a $50 speeding ticket (a large sum at the time), he gave the officer a $100 bill; when the officer protested that he couldn't make change for that much, Johnson told him to keep the change, as he was going to make his return trip at the same speed.[1] Johnson was also interested in opera (his favorite being Il Trovatore) and in history — he was an admirer of Napoleon Bonaparte, believing him to have risen from a similar origin to his own. In 1920, Johnson opened a night club in Harlem; he sold it three years later to a gangster, Owney Madden, who renamed it the Cotton Club.
    Johnson constantly flouted conventions regarding the social and economic "place" of blacks in American society. As a black man, he broke a powerful taboo in consorting with white women, and would constantly and arrogantly verbally taunt men (both white and black) inside and outside the ring. Johnson was pompous about his affection for white women, and imperious about his physical prowess, both in and out of the ring. Asked the secret of his staying power by a reporter who had watched a succession of women parade into, and out of, the champion's hotel room, Johnson supposedly said "Eat jellied eels and think distant thoughts".

  27. #27
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    John Moses Browning

  28. #28
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    Simo Häyhä aka "White Death"


      Spoiler:
    During the Winter War (1939–1940), between Finland and the Soviet Union, he began his duty as a sniper and fought for the Finnish Army against the Red Army in the 6th Company of JR 34 on the Kollaa River. In temperatures between −40 and −20 degrees Celsius, dressed completely in white camouflage, was credited with 505 confirmed kills of Soviet soldiers. A daily account of the kills at Kollaa was conducted for the Finnish snipers. Remarkably, all of Häyhä's kills were accomplished in fewer than 100 days – in other words, an average of 5 kills per day – at a time of year with very short hours of daylight.

    Häyhä used a Finnish militia variant of the Russian-made Mosin-Nagant rifle, the White Guard M/28-30 "Pystykorva" (literally Spitz, due to the sight's resemblance), because it suited his small frame (5 ft 3 in/1.60 m). He preferred to use iron sights rather than telescopic sights to present a smaller target (the sniper must raise his head higher when using a telescopic sight), for reliability (a telescopic sight's glass can fog up easily in cold weather) and for aid in concealment (sunlight glare in telescopic sight lenses can reveal a sniper's position).

    The Soviets tried several ploys to get rid of him, including counter-snipers and artillery strikes. On March 6, 1940, Häyhä was shot in the lower left jaw by a Russian soldier during combat. The bullet tumbled upon impact and exited his head. He was picked up by fellow soldiers who said "half his head was missing", but he was not dead: he regained consciousness on March 13, the day peace was declared. Shortly after the war, Häyhä was promoted from Alikersantti (Corporal) to Vänrikki (Second Lieutenant) by Field Marshal Carl Gustaf Emil Mannerheim. No one else has gained rank so quickly in Finland's military history.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Simo_H%C3%A4yh%C3%A4


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      Not Safe For Work


      Spoiler:
    Would smash!

  30. #30
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    Jimmy Johnson



      Spoiler:
    James William "Jimmy" Johnson (born July 16, 1943) is an American former NCAA and National Football League head coach. As of 2010, he is currently an analyst for Fox NFL Sunday, the Fox network's NFL pregame show. He was the first football coach whose teams won both an NCAA Division 1A National Championship and a Super Bowl. In 1993, Johnson wrote Turning The Thing Around: My Life in Football (ghostwritten by Ed Hinton). Johnson as of 2010 lives in Islamorada in the Florida Keys.
    Born in Port Arthur, Texas, Johnson graduated from Thomas Jefferson High School (renamed Memorial High School) in Port Arthur, where two of his classmates were singer Janis Joplin and actor G. W. Bailey.

    He attended college at the University of Arkansas and was a member of the 1964 National Championship football team, where he was an all-SWC defensive lineman for Hall of Fame coach Frank Broyles, and a teammate of future Dallas Cowboys owner Jerry Jones. Other teammates were Ken Hatfield, Jim Lindsey, Ronnie Caveness, and Loyd Phillips. Several future head coaches were assistant coaches for Frank Broyles and the Razorbacks during Johnson's career in Fayetteville: Hayden Fry, Johnny Majors and Barry Switzer. Johnson was nicknamed "Jimmy Jumpup" because he never stayed down on the ground for long during football practices or games as it was said his determination was boundless.


    Johnson's coaching tree includes a number of future head coaches such as Butch Davis, Norv Turner, Tommy Tuberville, Dave Campo and Dave Wannstedt. Johnson is one of only two head coaches to win both a college football national championship and a Super Bowl. The other is Barry Switzer, who also played college football at Arkansas (prior to Johnson), and was a rival head coach during their college coaching careers. Switzer was Johnson's successor as head coach of the Cowboys.


    Johnson began as an assistant coach at Louisiana Tech University in 1965 and Picayune Memorial High School in Picayune, Mississippi in 1966. In 1967 he was an assistant at Wichita State University, then in 1968 and 1969 he served under Johnny Majors at Iowa State University in Ames. In 1970 he moved on to another Big 8 school to become a defensive line coach at the University of Oklahoma, working alongside future rival Barry Switzer. In 1973, he returned to Arkansas, where he served as defensive coordinator through the 1976 season. Johnson had hopes of being named head coach when Frank Broyles retired, but was passed over for Lou Holtz. Holtz offered to retain Johnson on his staff, but Johnson decided it would be better to move on and amicably parted company with his alma mater. He became assistant head coach and defensive coordinator at the University of Pittsburgh under Jackie Sherrill in 1977 and 1978. His tenure at Pittsburgh was also highlighted by his introduction to a Pitt defenseman and then-assistant coach Dave Wannstedt who eventually teamed up with Johnson again at the University of Miami, the Cowboys and the Dolphins. He coached for five seasons at Oklahoma State University from 1979 to 1983 before taking the head coaching job at the University of Miami. Johnson interviewed for the head coaching job at Arkansas when Lou Holtz left following the 1983 season, then later found out that Ken Hatfield had already been hired. Upset that Frank Broyles (who was still the Arkansas athletic director) made no mention of this during the interview, Jimmy distanced himself from his alma mater. As payback for the snub, a home-and-home series was scheduled with Arkansas. In 1987 Miami gave Arkansas its worst home loss ever by a point margin of 51-7.

    In 1989, Jerry Jones, the new owner of the NFL's Dallas Cowboys, a long-time friend and former University of Arkansas teammate of Johnson's, asked him to be the new head coach, replacing Tom Landry, who had coached the team since its beginning in 1960. Johnson was reunited with former Miami standout Michael Irvin, and in Johnson's first season as coach, the 1989 Cowboys went 1–15. Johnson, however, did not take long to develop the Cowboys into a championship-quality team. Johnson had an ability to find talent in the draft, make savvy trades (namely, the trade of Herschel Walker, which yielded six high draft picks and a number of players from the Minnesota Vikings), and by signing quality players as free agents in the age before the NFL had imposed a salary cap, such as Jay Novacek.

    Johnson served as head coach of the Cowboys from 1989 through 1993. He is one of only six men in NFL history—(including Vince Lombardi, Don Shula, Chuck Noll, Mike Shanahan, and Bill Belichick)—to coach consecutive Super Bowl winners, winning Super Bowl XXVII in 1992 and Super Bowl XXVIII in 1993. Although no head coach has won three consecutive Super Bowls, only one head coach has led his teams to three consecutive NFL championships on the field (Vince Lombardi's Green Bay Packers 1965–1967). Johnson led the Cowboys to a record of 10-1 in the regular season during the month of Dec. from 1991–1993, also leading to a playoff record of 7-1 in those years. Johnson also had a record of 24-1 when Running Back Emmitt Smith ran for 100+ yards in a regular season game, and 5-0 in the post season, setting the culture for winning and keeping the lead in those years from 1990-1993 winning 2 Super Bowls. Jimmy Johnson and Jerry Jones mutually agreed to split due largely to their inability to work together. After Lombardi retired from coaching the Packers, Shula, Noll (twice), Shanahan, and Belichick all tried and failed to pull off the "three-peat".
    Jones then hired another former teammate at Arkansas, former University of Oklahoma head coach Barry Switzer and the Cowboys won Super Bowl XXX two seasons after Johnson's departure. Notable members on the team included Johnson holdovers, Troy Aikman, Emmitt Smith, Michael Irvin, and Super Bowl XXX MVP Larry Brown. Although Johnson still received a significant amount of credit for that third Super Bowl victory, 33 of his players from the 1993 Super Bowl team were not on the roster in 1995, including 30% of the starting line-ups.


  31. #31
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    Best one I have read so far.

    QUOTE=Steve O'Seinus;1044540]I don't think it gets any more badass than this guy.



    Whittemore was born in England. He came to North America in 1745 as an officer in the British Army, where he fought in King George's War (1744-48). He was involved in the capture of the French stronghold, Fort Louisburg. After the war he stayed in the colonies, settling in Menotomy, Massachusetts (present-day Arlington). He subsequently fought in the French and Indian War (1754-63) at the age of 64, once again assisting in the capture of Fort Louisburg.[2]

    On April 19, 1775, British forces were returning to Boston from the Battles of Lexington and Concord, the opening engagements of the war. On their march they were continually shot at by colonial militiamen.

    Whittemore was in his fields when he spotted an approaching British relief brigade under Earl Percy, sent to assist the retreat. Whittemore loaded his musket and ambushed the British from behind a nearby stone wall, killing one soldier. He then drew his dueling pistols and killed a grenadier and mortally wounded a second. By the time Whittemore had fired his third shot, a British detachment reached his position; Whittemore drew his sword and attacked. He was shot in the face, bayoneted thirteen times, and left for dead in a pool of blood. He was found alive, trying to load his musket to fight again. He was taken to Dr. Cotton Tufts of Medford, who perceived no hope for his survival. However, Whittemore lived another 18 years until dying of natural causes at the age of 98.[/QUOTE]

  32. #32

    Interesting Historical Figures Thread

    Every time I see that I feel like a **** for complaining about anything. Can't wait to start using that one on the kids. "Too hot to mow the yard? Let me tell you about this guy......"

  33. #33
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    I got nobody....just wanted to see my avi

  34. #34
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    Interesting Historical Figures Thread


    Jack Churchill

    An allied commander in WWII, and an avid fan of surfing, Captain Jack Malcolm Thorpe Fleming Churchill aka "Fighting Jack Churchill" aka "Mad Jack" was basically the craziest motherfucker in the whole damn war.
    He volunteered for commando duty, not actually knowing what it entailed, but knowing that it sounded dangerous, and therefore fun. He is best known for saying that "any officer who goes into action without his sword is improperly dressed" and, in following with this, for carrying a sword into battle. In WWII. And not one of those sissy ceremonial things the Marines have. No, Jack carried a ****ing claymore. And he used it, too. He is credited with capturing a total of 42 Germans and a mortar squad in the middle of the night, using only his sword.


    Churchill and his team were tasked with capturing a German fortification creatively called "Point 622." Churchill took the lead, charging ahead of the group into the dark through the barbed wire and mines, pitching grenades as he went. Although his unit did their best to catch up, all but six of them were lost to silly things like death. Of those six, half were wounded and all any of them had left were pistols. Then a mortar shell swung in and killed/mortally wounded everyone who wasn't Jack Churchill.
    When the Germans found him, he was playing "Will Ye No Come Back Again?" on his bagpipes. Oh, we didn't mention that? He carried them right next to his big ****ing sword.
    After being sent to a concentration camp, he got bored and left. Just walked out. They caught him again, and sent him to a new camp. So he left again. After walking 150 miles with only a rusty can of onions for food, he was picked up by the Americans and sent back to Britain, where he demanded to be sent back into the field, only to find out (with great disappointment) the war had ended while he was on his way there. As he later said to his friends, "If it wasn't for those damn Yanks, we could have kept the war going another 10 years!"
    The Best Hollywood Could Come Up With:
    Colonel Bill Kilgore (Robert DuVall) from Apocalypse Now, of "I love the smell of napalm in the morning" fame.

  35. #35
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    Everett Pope - World War 2 Medal of Honor Recipient


    On September 20, 1944, Captain Pope and his company set out to storm Hill 154, a steep, barren, coral hill protruding from the face of Suicide Ridge. From almost point-blank range, Japanese mortars and field guns opened up on them from adjoining peaks on Suicide Ridge. Pope and his men took Hill 154 at dusk after hours of bloody fighting which nearly annihilated the group.

    Forced to deploy his men thinly, he nevertheless determined to hold his ground for the night. Immediately after darkness fell, the Japanese started to attack, first in small infiltrating bands, and, when these units failed, in groups of 20 to 25 who tried storming the hill. Each time, the Marines opened fire with everything they had — one light machine gun, several Tommy guns and rifles, and a limited supply of hand grenades. When the grenades ran low, they hurled rocks. "We would throw three or four rocks, then a grenade. The Japanese didn't know which were which," one Marine said.

    By sunrise the Marines were beating off the enemy with bare fists and hurling ammunition boxes at them. Finally only eight riflemen remained. When daylight brought deadly fire, Pope was ordered to withdraw.

    For these actions, Pope was formally presented with the Medal of Honor by President Harry Truman during a ceremony in 1945.


  36. #36
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    János Bolyai (15 December 1802 – 27 January 1860), a Hungarian mathematician, one of the founders of non-Euclidean geometry


      Spoiler:
    By all accounts János Bolyai was something of an odd duck. He neither smoked nor drank, not even coffee. He once accepted a challenge to duel thirteen of his fellow cavalry officers on the condition that after each duel he would serenade the loser with a piece on his violin. He won all thirteen duels, but whether his opponents enjoyed his fiddling is not known.

  37. #37
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    Ok seriously. You want bad asses. Here is the best site on the net. Read a couple of,these stories and tell me these guys aren't the shit.

    http://www.cmohs.org/

  38. #38
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    William Franklin, Son of Ben Franklin Loyalist to the British Crown



    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William...age_and_family

      Spoiler:
    William Franklin (ca. 1730 - November 1814) was a British American soldier, attorney, and colonial administrator, the acknowledged illegitimate son of Benjamin Franklin. He was appointed as the last Colonial Governor of New Jersey (1763-1776). Franklin was a steadfast Loyalist throughout the American War of Independence. As his father was one of the most prominent Patriots and a Founding Father of the United States, their differences caused an irreconcilable break between them.
    Following imprisonment during the war, in 1782 the younger Franklin went into exile in Britain. He lived in London until his death.

  39. #39
    Cassius Marcellus Clay
    Cassius Clay was a pioneer, a southern aristocrat who became a prominent anti-slavery crusader. He was a son of Green Clay, one of the wealthiest landowners and slaveholders in Kentucky. Clay worked toward emancipation, both as a Kentucky state representative and as an early member of the Republican Party. [1]He spent 25 years of his life publishing "The True American" before Lincoln tapped him and asked, "Tell me about your Proclamation of Emancipation."
    Clay attended Transylvania University and then graduated from Yale College in 1832. While at Yale, he heard abolitionist William Lloyd Garrison speak, and Garrison's lecture inspired Clay to join the antislavery movement. Garrison’s arguments were to him “as water is to a thirsty wayfarer.”[2] Clay was politically pragmatic, supporting gradual legal change rather than the immediacy of the Garrisonians. [1]
    Clay served three terms in the Kentucky House of Representatives,[3] but he lost support among Kentucky voters as his platform became more focused on ending slavery. His anti-slavery activism won him enemies. During a political debate in 1843, he survived an assassination attempt by a hired gun, named Sam Brown, and despite being shot in the chest, and being restrained by the attacker's confederates, he defended himself, seriously wounding his attacker with his Bowie knife and throwing him over an embankment.[4]
    In 1845, he began publishing an anti-slavery newspaper called the True American in Lexington, Kentucky. Within a month he received death threats, had to arm himself, and had to barricade the doors of his newspaper office for protection. Shortly after, a mob of about sixty men broke into his office and seized his printing equipment, which they shipped to Cincinnati, Ohio. Clay continued publication there.[1]
    Again in 1849 while making a speech for slave emancipation he was attacked by the six Turner brothers, who beat, stabbed and attempted to shoot him, in the ensuing fight Clay fought off all six and killed Cyrus Turner after regaining his Bowie knife that had been taken from him earlier in the fight.[5]
    In 1853, Clay granted 10 acres to John G. Fee, an abolitionist, who founded the town of Berea, Kentucky, and in 1855, Berea College.[6]
    Even though he opposed the annexation of Texas, Clay served in the Mexican-American War. His connections to the northern antislavery movement remained strong, and he was a founder of the Republican party and a friend of Abraham Lincoln, supporting him for the presidency. Clay was briefly a candidate for the vice presidency at the 1860 Republican National Convention,[1] but lost the nomination to Hannibal Hamlin.
    and

    Clay had a reputation as a rebel and a fighter.[11] There were threats on his life, compelling him to carry two pistols and a knife for protection; in addition, he used a cannon to protect his home and office.[11]

  40. #40
    nocalsooner's Avatar
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    Jonas Salk.

  41. #41
    Originally Posted by usaosooner View Post
    William Franklin, Son of Ben Franklin Loyalist to the British Crown



    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William...age_and_family

      Spoiler:
    William Franklin (ca. 1730 - November 1814) was a British American soldier, attorney, and colonial administrator, the acknowledged illegitimate son of Benjamin Franklin. He was appointed as the last Colonial Governor of New Jersey (1763-1776). Franklin was a steadfast Loyalist throughout the American War of Independence. As his father was one of the most prominent Patriots and a Founding Father of the United States, their differences caused an irreconcilable break between them.
    Following imprisonment during the war, in 1782 the younger Franklin went into exile in Britain. He lived in London until his death.
    Actually not that interesting because most people back then felt they were British. It wasn't till the rich felt they were overtaxed that this changed. Actually most the British tax raises weren't tax raises. They were just cutting out loopholes and lowering taxes.

  42. #42
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    Originally Posted by SoonerLibertarian View Post
    Actually not that interesting because most people back then felt they were British.
    i found it interesting... so you are wrong
    The following users like this post: oucub23


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    Nikola Tesla
    /thread
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  44. #44
    Originally Posted by SoonerBeerSnob View Post
    Nikola Tesla
    /thread
    Great choice.

  45. #45
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    Originally Posted by nekkedJ_bird View Post
    I got nobody....just wanted to see my avi
    Its very cherry nice.

  46. #46
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    Israel Putnam



      Spoiler:
    anuary 7, 1718 – May 29, 1790) was an American army general and Freemason who fought with distinction at the Battle of Bunker Hill (1775) during the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783). His reckless courage and fighting spirit were known far beyond Connecticut's borders through the circulation of folk legends celebrating his exploits.
    He had notable service as an officer with Roger's Rangers during the French and Indian War, when he was captured but saved from ritual burning by Mohawk warriors by intervention of a French officer.

    Putnam took part in the French and Indian War as a member of Rogers' Rangers, and later led a similar company of rangers from Connecticut. He was promoted to captain in 1756 and to major in 1758. Captured on August 8, 1758 by the Kahnawake (Mohawk Indians) during a military campaign near Crown Point in New York, he was saved from being ritually burned alive by a rain storm and the last-minute intervention of a French officer.[1]


    Rescue of Major Israel Putnam near Glens Falls, 1758
    In 1759, Putnam led a regiment in the attack on Fort Carillon; and in 1760 he was with the British army that marched on Montreal. In 1762, he survived a shipwreck during the British expedition against Cuba that led to the capture of Havana. Major Putnam is believed to have brought back Cuban tobacco seeds to New England, which he planted in the Hartford area. This reportedly resulted in the development of the renowned Connecticut Wrapper (shade tobacco).
    In 1763 during Pontiac's Rebellion, Putnam was sent with reinforcements to relieve Pontiac's siege of Fort Detroit.
    Following the war, in 1765 Putnam publicly professed his Christian faith and joined the Congregational Church in Brooklyn.[2] Putnam was among those who objected to British taxation policies. For instance, around the time of the Stamp Act crisis in 1766, he was elected to the Connecticut General Assembly and was one of the founders of the state's chapter of the Sons of Liberty. In the fall of 1765, Putnam threatened Thomas Fitch, the popularly elected Connecticut Governor, over this issue. He said that Fitch's house "will be leveled with the dust in five minutes" if Fitch did not turn over the stamp tax paper to the Sons of Liberty.[3]

    Battle of Bunker Hill
    By the eve of the Revolution, Putnam had become a relatively prosperous farmer and tavern keeper, with more than a local reputation for his previous exploits. On April 20, 1775, when Putnam received news of the Battles of Lexington and Concord that started the war the day before, he left his plow in the field and rode 100 miles (160 km) in eight hours, reaching Cambridge the next day and offering his services to the patriot cause.[citation needed] Putnam was named major general, making him second in rank to General Artemas Ward in the Army of Observation that preceded the founding of the Continental Army.
    He was one of the primary figures at the Battle of Bunker Hill, both in its planning and on the battlefield. During that battle Putnam may have ordered William Prescott to tell his troops "Don't fire until you see the whites of their eyes" (It is debated exactly who said these words first; they are attributed to a number of officers). This command has since become one of the American Revolution's more memorable quotes. The order was important, because the New England troops entrenched on the hill were low on ammunition. Putnam joined the Continental Army when it was organized in July 1775, he was commissioned as colonel of the 3rd Connecticut Regiment, and later became brigadier of the Connecticut militia.

    After Bunker Hill, Putnam progressed to temporary command of the American forces in New York, while waiting for the arrival on April 13, 1776 of the commander-in-chief, Lieutenant General George Washington. The Battle of Bunker Hill must count as the greatest achievement in Putnam's life; afterward, his fortunes took a downturn at the Battle of Long Island in August 1776, where he was forced to effect a hasty retreat. Washington did not blame Putnam for this failure as some in the Second Continental Congress did. However, Washington reassessed the abilities of his general and assigned him to recruiting activities. In 1777 Putnam received another, though lesser, military command in the Hudson Highlands and his headquarters was at the Bush-Lyon Homestead.[4] With future Vice-President Aaron Burr in his charge, Putnam was fooled in October 1777 by a feint executed by British troops under the command of General Sir Henry Clinton, making way for Clinton's capture of Fort Montgomery and Fort Clinton. Putnam was brought before a court of inquiry for those actions, where he was exonerated of any wrongdoing.
    On Feb. 26, 1779, Putnam did his famed escape from the British, riding down a steep slope in Greenwich.[5] A statue commemorating this escape was erected at Putnam Memorial State Park in Redding, Connecticut. Anna Hyatt Huntington, a local sculptor, created the bronze statue in 1969.[6] During the winter of 1778-1779, Putnam and his troops were encamped at the site now preserved as the Putnam Memorial State Park in Redding, Connecticut. In December 1779, Putnam suffered a paralyzing stroke, which ended his military service.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Israel_Putnam

  47. #47
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    The Harpe Brothers. I've been to the Cave In Rock area that they camped at sometimes, and it's a very interesting place.




      Spoiler:
    The pair, along with the brutalized women and four other men, then began to make their way to Tennessee. During the trip, a man named Moses Doss had the “audacity” to be over-concerned for the brutalized women. For his concern, he was killed by the Harpes.

    They apparently came into Tennessee's Knox County some time between 1795 and 1797, settling close to a place called Beaver's Creek. By this time, says Doris Lane, they had killed five times — including four of their own children.

    The group then settled in the Cherokee-Chickamauga village of Nickajack located southwest of modern-day Chattanooga, Tennessee. For the next dozen years, the Harpes, along with their “wives” lived in the Indian village. During this time, both of the captive women became pregnant twice and their children were killed by their fathers.

    After the British surrendered at Yorktown in 1781, the Chickamauga and a break-away band of Cherokee continued to make war on American patriots and the Harpes were only too willing to help them, fighting in the Battle of Blue Licks, Kentucky, on August 19, 1782 and other smaller skirmishes.

    In September 1794, the Americans planned to take the offensive against the Indians at Nickajack, but somehow, the Harpes got wind of the attack and fled before the patriots wiped out the village. The Harpes and their women then settled down at a new camp nearby, where they stayed for the next nine months, once again pillaging local villages in Tennessee. By the spring of 1797, they were living in a cabin on Beaver's Creek near Knoxville. That same year, Little Harpe married a local girl; a minister’s daughter, named Sarah Rice, and the other two women became the “wives” of Big Harpe.

    Just over a year later, in late 1798, the Harpes would begin their murder spree, one of the most violent in the nation’s history. They first killed two men in Tennessee, one in Knox County and one on the Wilderness Trail. By December, they had moved on to Kentucky, where they killed two traveling men from Maryland.

    Unlike most outlaws of the time, they seemed to be more motivated by blood lust than financial gain, often leaving their victims disemboweled, filling their abdominal cavities with rocks, and sinking them in a river.

    Next, a man named John Langford, who was traveling from Virginia to Kentucky, turned up dead and a local innkeeper pointed the authorities to the Harpes. The criminal pair was then pursued, captured, and jailed in Danville, Kentucky, but they managed to escape. When a posse was sent after them, the young son of a man who assisted the authorities, was found dead and mutilated.

    On April 22, 1799, the Kentucky Governor issued a $300 reward on each of the Harpe heads. Fleeing northward, the Harpes killed two men named Edmonton and Stump. When they were near the mouth of the Saline River, they came upon three men who were encamped, and killed all three. The pair then made their way to Cave-In-The-Rock in southern Illinois, a stronghold of the river pirate, Samuel Mason. In the meantime, the posse was aggressively pursuing them, but unfortunately stopped just short of Cave-in-The-Rock.

    Along with their wives and three children in tow, the Harpes holed up with the Samuel Mason Gang, who preyed on slow-moving flatboats making their way along the Ohio River. This place was a "natural fortress honeycombed with subterranean passages so large that the Harpes hid herds of cattle and horses in them."

    However; though the Mason Gang could be ruthless, even they were appalled at the actions of the Harpes. After the murderous pair began to make a habit of taking travelers to the top of the bluff, stripping them naked, and throwing them off, they were asked to leave.

    The Harpes then returned to Eastern Tennessee, where they continued their vicious murder spree in earnest. In July 1798, they killed a farmer named Bradbury, a man named Hardin, and a boy named Coffey. Soon, more bodies were discovered including William Ballard, who had been disemboweled and thrown in the Holton River, James Brassel, who had his throat viciously slashed was discovered on Brassel’s Knob, and another man named John Tully was also found murdered.

    In south central Kentucky, John Graves and his teenaged son were found dead with their heads axed, and in Logan County the Harpes killed a little girl, a young slave, and an entire family who were asleep in their camp. In August, a few miles northeast of Russellville, Kentucky, Big Harpe killed his daughter, by bashing her head against a tree, because the baby was crying.

    That same month a man named Trowbridge was found disemboweled in Highland Creek and when they were given shelter at the Stegall home in Webster County, the pair killed an overnight guest named Major William Love, as well as Mrs. Stegall’s four-month old baby boy, whose throat was slit when it cried. When Mrs. Stegall screamed at the sight of her infant being killed, she too, was murdered.

    In another county, the Harpes murdered Hugh Dunlap, who had threatened to arrest them. He'd apparently made it clear that he intended to bring them to justice, no matter what it took. For his trouble, he lost his life. Around the same time, a man named Ballard fell victim to the marauders, and they stuffed his body with stones before throwing it into a river. A man and his son were both slaughtered while out planting crops, as was most of a family camping near the Whippoorwill River. There was only one survivor, who ran. Around this time, Micajah also killed his (or Wiley's) four-month-old daughter by swinging her by the ankles to smash her head against a tree.

    Wearing scalps in their belts and the buckskin of Native Americans, the Harpes sought ways to bring misery all around. They made no distinction among children, women or men as their victims, or between free men and slaves. They simply ****d, thieved, and killed as opportunities arose.

    Moving along the Cumberland Gap, the Harpes and their wives traveled on Boon's trace, a path that took them into Kentucky, toward Richland Creek. There they met a peddler named Peyton, who was taking goods via horseback to various settlements. He had quite a load, and the prospect of taking these items was too rich for the Harpes, so they killed him and confiscated everything he had, including his pack horse.

  48. #48
    MoJoOkie's Avatar
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    Harpe Brothers continued ...




      Spoiler:
    From there, they journeyed toward a public house for wayfarers, operated by a man named Pharris (or Farris).

    They arrived early in the morning, dirty and ragged from days on the trail, and demanded breakfast. A young man name Thomas Langford, on his way to Virginia, was already eating his repast. Pharris' wife served food to the Harpes, but after they had eaten, they haggled over the price, insisting that they would not pay.

    Langford intervened to defend her, since her husband was not there to do it, and the Harpes turned their wrath on him. But he stood his ground, determined to do what was right.

    "You have no cause to argue with a lady," Langford said. "If you're short on funds, I have plenty of money and I'll pay for the food." His aim was to make them desist in their abuse of Mrs. Pharris. He clearly did not realize that he'd just been scammed, as well as targeted for further treatment; he had revealed too much about himself and had become a tantalizing morsel. The Harpes, spotting his naiveté, accepted his offer and he paid the bill. They pretended to be reconciled and even suggested that Langford travel with their entourage as protection against the dangers on the road. He readily accepted.

    After breakfast, they all set off together, traveling several miles until they were beyond anyone's view. In an instant, the Harpes set upon young Langford, killing him and taking his money. They tossed his corpse on the side of the road, covering it with some brush, and went their way.

    There it lay, decomposing, until some cattle drivers happened along. The cattle smelled it first and the herd took off in diverse directions, bellowing as if a lion were at their tails. The cattle drovers were clueless about what had startled them so suddenly, but they had little time to ponder it. They ran to catch the stray cattle and herd them back together. While engaged in this task, one of them discovered Langford's body and called to his cohorts. Those with the courage to venture close looked through the corpse's effects for some indication of his identity. On his clothing, they found his name: Thomas Langford

    They used a blanket to gather up the remains and carried him to the nearest public house to try to get help. This happened to be the Pharris establishment. The family recognized him at once as their previous lodger, and they remembered that he had gone off with the bedraggled family who had raised such a row about the price of their food. It seemed clear to everyone what had happened: The Harpes had lured Langford away and then killed him for his money.

    The killings continued as the Harpes fled west to avoid the posse, which included Moses Stegall, whose family the Harpes had killed earlier in the month. While the pair was preparing to kill another settler named George Smith, the posse finally tracked them down on August 24, 1799. Calling for their surrender, the two sped away, but Big Harpe was shot in the leg and the back. The posse soon caught up with him and pulled him from his horse.

    One of his captors asked, "Why did you do this? Why kill all those people?"

    Harpe's response, readily given, was a classic answer, one that many future serial killers would echo. He said that he and his brother had grown disgusted with all mankind "and agreed with each other to destroy as many persons as they could." Harpe admitted that he knew he would one day pay the ultimate price, but he was determined to slaughter as many people as he could before that happened.

    As he lay dying, he confessed to 20 murders, he said that there was only one murder for which he bore remorse: the murder of his own child. He had killed it, he said, because its crying had annoyed him. (This may have been the baby he smashed into a tree.) Soon arriving on the scene, Mr. Stegall, appropriately, slowly cut off the outlaw’s head, ensuring he would suffer and suffer and suffer. Once account described Stegall as grabbing him by the hair and running the blade in a slow sawing motion across the back of his neck. Micajah definitely suffered, but one writer reports that he didn't cry out. Instead, he stared at Stegall "with a grim and fiendish countenance, exclaiming, 'You are a God damned rough butcher, but cut on and be damned.'" Retribution, perhaps, for just some of the pain and misery he had caused not only Mr. Stegall, but many other victims.

    At the time of his death, Harpe was only 31 years old.

    Later, Harpe’s head was hanged on a pole at a crossroads near Henderson, Kentucky. For years, the intersection where the pole stood was called Harpe's Head.

    In the meantime, Little Harpe escaped and soon rejoined the Mason Gang pirates at Cave-in-Rock. Four years later, Little Harpe was using the alias of John Setton. When a large reward was offered for the head of their leader, Samuel Mason, Harpe, along with a fellow pirate named James May, killed Mason and cut off his head to collect the money. However, as they presented the head, they were recognized as outlaws themselves and arrested. The two soon escaped but were quickly recaptured, tried, and sentenced to be hanged. On February 8, 1804, Harpe and Hays were hanged and their heads cut off and placed high on stakes along the Natchez Road as a warning to other outlaws.

    During their terrible crime spree the Harpes killed more than 40 men, women and children.

  49. #49
    usaosooner's Avatar
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    Giordano Bruno

      Spoiler:
    Giordano Bruno (Italian pronunciation: [dʒorˈdano ˈbruno]; 1548 – February 17, 1600), (Latin: Iordanus Brunus Nolanus) born Filippo Bruno, was an Italian Dominican friar, philosopher, mathematician and astronomer. His cosmological theories went beyond the Copernican model in proposing that the Sun was essentially a star, and moreover, that the universe contained an infinite number of inhabited worlds populated by other intelligent beings.[2] After the Roman Inquisition found him guilty of heresy, he was burned at the stake.[3] After his death he gained considerable fame, particularly among 19th- and early 20th-century commentators who, focusing on his astronomical beliefs, regarded him as a martyr for free thought and modern scientific ideas.
    Some assessments suggest that Bruno's ideas about the universe played a smaller role in his trial than his pantheist beliefs, which differed from the interpretations and scope of God held by the Catholic Church.[4][5] In addition to his cosmological writings, Bruno also wrote extensively on the art of memory, a loosely organized group of mnemonic techniques and principles. The work of Frances Yates, especially influential in anglophone scholarship, argues that Bruno was deeply influenced by Arab astrology, Neoplatonism and Renaissance Hermeticism.[6] Other studies of Bruno have focused on his qualitative approach to mathematics and his application of the spatial paradigms of geometry to language.[7]


    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Giordano_Bruno

  50. #50
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    Originally Posted by SoonerBeerSnob View Post
    Nikola Tesla
    /thread
    James Clerk Maxwell

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