okc sux....

Posted 668 day(s) ago by 87sooner3929 Views 111 Replies
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  1. #51
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    Originally Posted by Aurora View Post
    So crazy they have not enforced it, during the severe part of the drought here they were issuing $500 tickets for watering and making sure the sprinklers on the sides road were not on. Hopefully OK gets some rain
    Around San Diego you have to register the number of people that live in your house with water department. If your water usage exceeds what they allocate you based on the number of people living in your house then you get fined.

  2. #52
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    Originally Posted by drumhead23us View Post
    Be careful. You could accidentally inspire a sequel to The Grapes of Wrath.
    California is worse off than Oklahoma.

  3. #53
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    Originally Posted by Stinger_1066 View Post
    Around San Diego you have to register the number of people that live in your house with water department. If your water usage exceeds what they allocate you based on the number of people living in your house then you get fined.
    That will eventually be a national regulation/law if we keep voting for the Obama types.
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  4. #54
    Is Canton our only backup source in OKC? Thought I had heard we had something in SE Oklahoma as well

  5. #55
    Originally Posted by OU48A View Post
    That will eventually be a national regulation/law if we keepvoting for the Obama types.
    Sounds fine to me. Should have learned from the Native Americans that natural resources are precious and we pay dire consequences when we **** the land

  6. #56
    Originally Posted by Julz View Post
    Is Canton our only backup source in OKC? Thought I had heard we had something in SE Oklahoma as well
    yes....there is another option but i can't remember which lake.....i'll see if i can find the article from a couple weeks ago...
    not sure why they decided to drain canton first........

  7. #57
    Originally Posted by 87sooner View Post
    yes....there is another option but i can't remember which lake.....i'll see if i can find the article from a couple weeks ago...
    not sure why they decided to drain canton first........
    I found this on okc.gov's website
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  8. #58
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    I blame all the bathers. 1.2 million people are going to die so you can take your precious showers. Do you feel good about yourselves?

  9. #59
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    Originally Posted by soonerdm View Post
    Sounds fine to me. Should have learned from the Native Americans that natural resources are precious and we pay dire consequences when we **** the land
    We all know that would sound find to you….

  10. #60
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    Originally Posted by Julz View Post
    I found this on okc.gov's website
    I believe there is a plan that calls for the construction of a new pipeline that would parallel the existing Atoka pipeline.
    I thought I read that construction would start in about 2 years.
    If possible they should try to move up its construction date.

  11. #61
    Originally Posted by OU48A View Post
    We all know that would sound find to you….
    So your stance is use everything you want as much as you want? I bet you're for mercury and pollutants in the drinking water... as long as it turns a profit... thank god you are close to death

  12. #62
    Greywater usage is something to look at in the near future. There are plenty of potential uses for it.

  13. #63
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    Originally Posted by soonerdm View Post
    So your stance is use everything you want as much as you want? I bet you're for mercury and pollutants in the drinking water... as long as it turns a profit... thank god you are close to death
    You assume much

  14. #64
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    Originally Posted by SoCaliSooner View Post
    Video don't lie...
    the video is still correct.

  15. #65
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    Originally Posted by Steve O'Seinus View Post
    Greywater usage is something to look at in the near future. There are plenty of potential uses for it.
    Yep
    It’s been used in Norman and at OU for irrigation for several years.
    But its use should be expanded.

  16. #66
    Originally Posted by OU48A View Post
    Yep
    It’s been used in Norman and at OU for irrigation for several years.
    But its use should be expanded.
    I think Hefner uses it for their course as well. Not sure about the other city public courses.

  17. #67
    Originally Posted by Steve O'Seinus View Post
    Greywater usage is something to look at in the near future. There are plenty of potential uses for it.

    it's amazing how much water is being used right now in the oil field......some is coming directly from water towers....

  18. #68
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    Originally Posted by 87sooner View Post
    it's amazing how much water is being used right now in the oil field......some is coming directly from water towers....
    The good news is that the drilling boom will eventually slow….
    but there is always GASFRAC…..

  19. #69
    Originally Posted by 87sooner View Post
    it's amazing how much water is being used right now in the oil field......some is coming directly from water towers....
    I have a friend who works at the Salt Plains Wildlife Refuge, says the water level is crazy low for exactly that reason. There are fines for taking too much water from the area, don't know the specific details, but oil companies don't gievv a shit because the fines are nothing to them. He says there are water trucks running in and out of there all day.

  20. #70
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    There's no reason to fight over water. Water's free, man.

  21. #71
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    Since the glaciers are just melting in the ocean and causing sea levels to rise why not chip off giant pieces of them and fill up some inland water supplies...

    Non-genius / best worst idea ever ... you are welcome
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  22. #72
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    Why doesn't everyone just run their hose to the lake and fill it back up?

    /thread
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  23. #73
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    Originally Posted by Aurora View Post
    Is it a natural lake or was it a man made reservoir lake. There are some lakes like that here and people were pissed when Houston started using the water and their lake front property was no longer lake front. All the way around it is sad.
    I can understand them being pissed. It probably killed their home values and left a ton of people even further upside down on their loans coupled with the down turn in the economy over the last five years.

  24. #74
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    Originally Posted by suncoastsooner View Post
    I can understand them being pissed. It probably killed their home values and left a ton of people even further upside down on their loans coupled with the down turn in the economy over the last five years.
    I am certain of this and I understand, however when buying lakefront you have to know drought can **** you

  25. #75
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    On a side note there is a huge halabaloo here about Georgia and the Army Corps of Engineers damning up the Chattahoochee river to provide more water for Atlanta but this is destroying the Apalachicola Bay and especially the oyster industry there. Something about the silt the carries down stream is a big reason Apalachicola Oysters are considered superior to most other oysters and it is one of the largest privatized industries in the region.

  26. #76
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    Originally Posted by suncoastsooner View Post
    On a side note there is a huge halabaloo here about Georgia and the Army Corps of Engineers damning up the Chattahoochee river to provide more water for Atlanta but this is destroying the Apalachicola Bay and especially the oyster industry there. Something about the silt the carries down stream is a big reason Apalachicola Oysters are considered superior to most other oysters and it is one of the largest privatized industries in the region.
    Humans ****ing with nature since we learned to build shit... Unfortunately there are lots of cases where our human needs (wants) destroy things that are wonderful.
    I want oysters now

  27. #77
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    Last edited by SoonerBounce; January 31st, 2013 at 12:23 PM. Reason: fucker

  28. #78
    Originally Posted by Steve O'Seinus View Post
    I have a friend who works at the Salt Plains Wildlife Refuge, says the water level is crazy low for exactly that reason. There are fines for taking too much water from the area, don't know the specific details, but oil companies don't gievv a shit because the fines are nothing to them. He says there are water trucks running in and out of there all day.

    salt plains has been nothing but a mud hole for several years...
    i thought i had heard it went completely dry.....
    i think last i read......there are studies underway to decide if the lake should be decommissioned ...
    it's a sad situation......it used to be a very nice lake.....it has completely silted in....

  29. #79
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    Originally Posted by Julz View Post
    I found this on okc.gov's website
    OKC has turned Atoka lake into a mud hole. McGee (one of the best lakes in the state) is getting drained just to keep atoka more than a puddle. I fear that OKC will drain it also.
    I'm just glad the Choctaws and Chickasaws are fighting the OKC water board and trying to save Sardis.

  30. #80
    Originally Posted by Tundra View Post
    OKC has turned Atoka lake into a mud hole. McGee (one of the best lakes in the state) is getting drained just to keep atoka more than a puddle. I fear that OKC will drain it also.
    I'm just glad the Choctaws and Chickasaws are fighting the OKC water board and trying to save Sardis.
    This conforms much more so with what the Canton Lake Association was told - if Canton Lake can't provide a long term stop gap, the board is going to turn Hefner into a raw sewage treatment plant. They are out of options. I wonder how the Quail Creek, Greens, and Gallardia folk will enjoy that smell on a warm summer afternoon.

  31. #81
    Originally Posted by Bruno Gianelli View Post
    This conforms much more so with what the Canton Lake Association was told - if Canton Lake can't provide a long term stop gap, the board is going to turn Hefner into a raw sewage treatment plant. They are out of options. I wonder how the Quail Creek, Greens, and Gallardia folk will enjoy that smell on a warm summer afternoon.

    that's exactly what they deserve....
    but why exactly would they do that?

  32. #82
    Originally Posted by Wailer View Post
    water is the new oil. there will be wars among friendlies before this is over
    See Texoma.

  33. #83
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  34. #84
    Originally Posted by Mississippi Sooner View Post
    There's no reason to fight over water. Water's free, man.
    http://www.pegasusnews.com/news/2013...supreme-court/

  35. #85
    Originally Posted by Soonerpsycho View Post


    Canton Lake?

  36. #86
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    Originally Posted by Bruno Gianelli View Post
    Canton Lake?
    Canton Lake Mudhole

  37. #87
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    What was Canton Lake. July 2011.

  38. #88
    Originally Posted by Soonerpsycho View Post


    i fished there a few times about a year ago.....it looked about the same then as your pic.......about a 200ft wide channel from the dam out to the lake...
    man i hope they get a toad strangler before summer....

  39. #89
    At one point engineers were talking about diverting the Arkansas River around the great salt plains, which would make Keystone Lake a drinkable reservoir. Of course it would destroy the salt plains as a refuge.

    Water table gardens are a great way to get rainwater, (if it ever rains there again) back into the water table. The are dug deeper that a regular flower garden, filled in with large stones and rocks, the top soil. Run-off gets past topsoil layers and into the water table.

  40. #90

    What is a Rain Garden / Bioretention Area?


    Also available in Adobe PDF format PDF icon

    A Rain Garden - Bioretention area is a form of a man made ecosystem - a type of constructed bio-filter that is a vital part of the natural hydrological cycle, something we all learned about in elementary school!!! The rain garden collects and stores excess rain water from roofs of buildings or from driveways or parking lots - thus preventing this run-off from polluting our streams and causing flooding and erosion of stream banks. The rain garden uses natural means to store and process and filter and purify this water before infiltrating it into the ground water table below the rain garden bioretention area. This ground water feeds our springs and streams.

    Why is it important?

    Infiltration of rain water using rain gardens - bioretention - infiltration swales or trenches or various forms of pervious paving (pervious asphalt paving, pervious concrete paving, gravel pavers, grass pavers, and brick or formed concrete pavers) all help to divert water from our overloaded municipal storm water systems - and instead - emulate the forest or meadow ecosystem - and associated natural hydrological cycle that existed before your home or office or local shopping center was built. The rain garden filters, purifies and stores rain water - it supports plant life and habitat and it recharges our ground water tables - which in turn feed our natural springs (seen to your right near STATION 16) This clean purified rain water that leaves the rain garden - bioretention area - provides these springs and streams with clear clean pure pollution free water which is essential to providing base flows in our streams and rivers. Maintaining seasonal base flows - is obviously beneficial to wildlife and all plants and animals and the habitats that they live in. Water is the giver of Life - a rain garden man made way of emulating natures own water filtration process - which is part of the natural hydrological cycle.

    Current Best Management Practices (BPM’s) for storm water management in residential, commercial and institutional development have been focused on hard engineered systems with extensive and costly concrete curbs, gutters, catch basins, manholes, concrete channels and buried concrete storm water pipes - and also in many cases large costly storm water detention basins - those unsightly craters or “dry-ponds” you see around housing developments and shopping centers and highway interchanges which fill up with water after a hard rain. Infiltration based Low Impact Development (LID) storm water strategies like the rain garden - bioretention area are a key to solving many storm water and non-point source pollution problems we have here in Pennsylvania and across the US.

    LID type storm water technologies area better than the previous hard engineered concrete BMPs because unlike these older BMP’s - rain gardens, bioretention areas and other LID storm water technologies do the following:

    1) they hold and store collected rain water more effectively and for a longer period of time;

    2) they promote evapo-transpiration through pants and trees which cools the air and the environment around our towns and cities;

    3) “rain-garden” bioretention areas support new plant life and create a habitat for animals and plants and helpful insects;

    4) when designed properly - they DO NOT foster the growth of mosquitoes and other nuisance bugs as there is no standing water - except for a very small amount (about 6 inches) for just a few hours after a very heavy rain;

    5) they filter and purify the rain water - and remove pollutants such as motor oil and antifreeze and other heavy metals that come from run-off from parking lots and driveways;

    6) The plants and bio-mass, mulch and soil and plants and bugs and microbes and other critters in the rain garden bioretention area actually process these pollutants - and help break them down naturally - thus preventing these pollutants from entering our vital ground water tables and from going straight into our streams rivers and bays and oceans.)

    7) rain-garden bioretention areas also very effectively help us to recharge our local ground water tables - which are a primary source of our drinking water, and water for businesses and industry which are vital to all Pennsylvanians! Rain Gardens prevent non-point-source pollutants from being piped directly into our streams which is what current BMP’s do.

    8) they help replenish ground water tables - with clean purified water that then feeds our natural springs which in turn feed our streams and rivers, ponds, lakes and bays. Preserving the natural hydrological cycle using a rain garden/bioretention area is a way of copying the service nature provided us with before we started to develop our land!

    How do I build a Rain-garden/Bioretention area for my home or office?

    See the diagram on the other side of this flyer (Special thanks to Tom Cahill and Associates of West Chester PA for helping to design the Rain Garden / Bioretention Display found at STATION 21 at the DCNR/PA Fish and Boat Commission / PA Game Commission display at the 2003 PA Flower and Garden Show at the PA Farm Show complex in Harrisburg, PA on March 14-16, 2003. There are various strategies for making the potting mix that is the heart (and middle layer) of the rain garden - bioretention area.

    The potting mix for the DCNR exhibit is the same mix that is being used for the construction at several rain gardens being installed at State Parks throughout the Commonwealth. This mix - as seen at STATION 21 is ¼ soil (from your site), ¼ sand, ¼ shredded leaf mulch (or organic compost from your back-yard compost pile) and ¼ fine shredded wood chips (shredded limbs, Christmas trees, etc which you can usually find at the local county landfill or recycling center)

    Where to go for more information:

    Go to The Low Impact Development Center’s Website at www.lowimpactdevelopment.org for great general design details, and see two helpful brochures “Builders Guide to Low Impact Development” and “Municipal Guide to Low Impact Development”. (Both downloadable at no cost in pdf format) Also contact your local Landscape Architect for proper plant selection - plants must meet three requirements - they must be local indigenous species, they must be drought and disease resistant, and they must also tolerate having “wet feet” on occasion (plants must be mold and fungus resistant as the rain garden area will be both wet and dry at different times of the year!

    If Designing a large rain garden - bioretention area or a pervious parking area - please consult a qualified civil engineer with experience in designing infiltration LID technologies. For addition information see also: www.goprincegeorgescounty.com; www.toolbase.org; and www.epa.gov/owow/nps/urban.html.

    Explore the Benefits of adding a rain garden - bioretention area to your home or work place!
    Last edited by SoonerWalkon; February 11th, 2013 at 09:26 PM.

  41. #91
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    The History Channel keeps foreshadowing me sinking into the Gulf but you ****ers are sinking into the sand. I'll take my chances.
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  42. #92
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    Re: okc sux....

    Originally Posted by 87sooner View Post
    i fished there a few times about a year ago.....it looked about the same then as your pic.......about a 200ft wide channel from the dam out to the lake...
    man i hope they get a toad strangler before summer....
    Great sand bass in that lake.

  43. #93
    Originally Posted by Palmbeachsooner View Post
    Great sand bass in that lake.
    we've caught nearly 10 pound walleye....20 pound channel cats.......and 12 pound hybrid stripers.....just a few years ago...
    i haven't seen the sand bass run in years because there just hasn't been any spring rains to make the river flow....but it was easy to catch 50 sand bass when it did...

  44. #94
    Originally Posted by 87sooner View Post
    your wastefulness will ruin a great lake....

    http://newsok.com/water-released-fro...rticle/3750383

    I haven't read through this whole thread, but since when was Canton Lake a "great lake"? I almost spilled my coffee laughing at that.

  45. #95
    Let me get this straight. Using a reservoir for what it was designed for is "raping the land"??? These lakes are man-made for the purpose of providing water. As an avid outdoorsman, I HATE that we are losing shoreline, but it's the drought's fault, not the state's. It sucks for all involved, but we're in a major drought. No one is really to blame.

  46. #96
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    Originally Posted by 87sooner View Post
    we've caught nearly 10 pound walleye....20 pound channel cats.......and 12 pound hybrid stripers.....just a few years ago...
    i haven't seen the sand bass run in years because there just hasn't been any spring rains to make the river flow....but it was easy to catch 50 sand bass when it did...
    If you are ever out west I recommend American Horse Lake. It's south of Watonga. It has Kentucky spotted bass and the water is as clear as I've ever seen in Oklahoma aside from perhaps Broken Bow. Drop shot is the way to go. Love that place. It is pristine.
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  47. #97
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    Originally Posted by Aurora View Post
    Since the glaciers are just melting in the ocean and causing sea levels to rise why not chip off giant pieces of them and fill up some inland water supplies...
    All we need are some C-5's to carry it (or a bunch of those big Sikorsky choppers)...


  48. #98
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    Originally Posted by Palmbeachsooner View Post
    If you are ever out west I recommend American Horse Lake. It's south of Watonga. It has Kentucky spotted bass and the water is as clear as I've ever seen in Oklahoma aside from perhaps Broken Bow. Drop shot is the way to go. Love that place. It is pristine.
    I will only go there if there are no colored people allowed

  49. #99
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    Re: okc sux....

    Originally Posted by SoonerBounce View Post
    I will only go there if there are no colored people allowed
    Suit yourself

  50. #100
    Originally Posted by Section31 View Post
    Let me get this straight. Using a reservoir for what it was designed for is "raping the land"??? These lakes are man-made for the purpose of providing water. As an avid outdoorsman, I HATE that we are losing shoreline, but it's the drought's fault, not the state's. It sucks for all involved, but we're in a major drought. No one is really to blame.
    the people in charge of water in okc are buffoons....
    yes ....we are in a drought.......yet those in okc did nothing to prepare/conserve......they kept watering lawns thru the summer and right on thru the winter......
    what's going to happen if we get no spring rains to replenish hefner/canton? where will they get water next time they need it?